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The Next Recession May Come By Stealth

Markets have been blowing hot and cold regarding the prospects of a recession in the U.S. The Institute of Supply Management’s November survey shows that the index of factory activities in the U.S. fell to 48.1 from 48.3 in October (any reading below 50 is indicative of a contraction). This is confounding the expectation that America’s domestic industrial production would improve in anticipation of a “deal” in the U.S.-China trade war. However, the Department of Labor also reported that 266,000 jobs have been added to the economy in November, bringing unemployment rate down to a historic low of 3.5%. A confusing situation has just been made more confusing. It has been said that generals are always fighting the last war. It’s not that different when it comes to fighting economic downturns. Since the global financial crisis a decade ago, we have been scouring the horizon for any signs of financial fragility, such as asset bubbles, that could plunge us into the next global recession. Despite mounting evidence of a weakening economy, there are no asset bubbles comparable to that of the pre-2008 period. And we won’t find any, even as we edge closer to the next recession. Since the last global financial crisis, the global economy has been reshaped by different forces, and the coming recession will be caused by factors totally different from those of the last one. First off, the global economy today is mired in uncertainty arising from the trade war, an enfeebled Europe, Brexit and rising geopolitical tensions. An even deeper source of uncertainty is that the liberal global economic order, in place since the 1950s, is dying. Two trends are converging to kill it. The first is the West’s declining economic dominance relative to the rest of the world, and China in particular. The second is the rise of populism in Western democracies, arguably the most serious challenge to the legitimacy of the liberal global order. And yet, even as the liberal global economic order fades away, it’s unclear what a post-liberal global economic order will look like. So for now, the global economy is like a barfly at closing time: it has no clue where it’s going, but it can’t stay here. Developed world economies have meanwhile been seriously weakened by prolonged zero interest rates, making them vulnerable to unexpected shocks. Extraordinarily low interest rates distort the price of money, arguably the single most important price signal in a market economy. They poison the business environment, allowing poorly run businesses to survive, jamming the gears of creative destruction that drive any economic renewal. The survival of poorly run businesses also suck profits from more successful businesses, sapping their ability to expand. Against this backdrop, any number of missteps could trigger chain reactions that push developed world economies into recession. But we should also be prepared for a potentially different kind of downturn. The accepted definition of a recession is two consecutive quarters of contraction in an economy.… Read More →

sample accessily post 1

The Next Recession May Come By Stealth

Markets have been blowing hot and cold regarding the prospects of a recession in the U.S. The Institute of Supply Management’s November survey shows that the index of factory activities in the U.S. fell to 48.1 from 48.3 in October (any reading below 50 is indicative of a contraction). This is confounding the expectation that America’s domestic industrial production would improve in anticipation of a “deal” in the U.S.-China trade war. However, the Department of Labor also reported that 266,000 jobs have been added to the economy in November, bringing unemployment rate down to a historic low of 3.5%. A confusing situation has just been made more confusing. It has been said that generals are always fighting the last war. It’s not that different when it comes to fighting economic downturns. Since the global financial crisis a decade ago, we have been scouring the horizon for any signs of financial fragility, such as asset bubbles, that could plunge us into the next global recession. Despite mounting evidence of a weakening economy, there are no asset bubbles comparable to that of the pre-2008 period. And we won’t find any, even as we edge closer to the next recession. Since the last global financial crisis, the global economy has been reshaped by different forces, and the coming recession will be caused by factors totally different from those of the last one. First off, the global economy today is mired in uncertainty arising from the trade war, an enfeebled Europe, Brexit and rising geopolitical tensions. An even deeper source of uncertainty is that the liberal global economic order, in place since the 1950s, is dying. Two trends are converging to kill it. The first is the West’s declining economic dominance relative to the rest of the world, and China in particular. The second is the rise of populism in Western democracies, arguably the most serious challenge to the legitimacy of the liberal global order. And yet, even as the liberal global economic order fades away, it’s unclear what a post-liberal global economic order will look like. So for now, the global economy is like a barfly at closing time: it has no clue where it’s going, but it can’t stay here. Developed world economies have meanwhile been seriously weakened by prolonged zero interest rates, making them vulnerable to unexpected shocks. Extraordinarily low interest rates distort the price of money, arguably the single most important price signal in a market economy. They poison the business environment, allowing poorly run businesses to survive, jamming the gears of creative destruction that drive any economic renewal. The survival of poorly run businesses also suck profits from more successful businesses, sapping their ability to expand. Against this backdrop, any number of missteps could trigger chain reactions that push developed world economies into recession. But we should also be prepared for a potentially different kind of downturn. The accepted definition of a recession is two consecutive quarters of contraction in an economy.… Read More →

sample accessily post 1

The Next Recession May Come By Stealth

Markets have been blowing hot and cold regarding the prospects of a recession in the U.S. The Institute of Supply Management’s November survey shows that the index of factory activities in the U.S. fell to 48.1 from 48.3 in October (any reading below 50 is indicative of a contraction). This is confounding the expectation that America’s domestic industrial production would improve in anticipation of a “deal” in the U.S.-China trade war. However, the Department of Labor also reported that 266,000 jobs have been added to the economy in November, bringing unemployment rate down to a historic low of 3.5%. A confusing situation has just been made more confusing. It has been said that generals are always fighting the last war. It’s not that different when it comes to fighting economic downturns. Since the global financial crisis a decade ago, we have been scouring the horizon for any signs of financial fragility, such as asset bubbles, that could plunge us into the next global recession. Despite mounting evidence of a weakening economy, there are no asset bubbles comparable to that of the pre-2008 period. And we won’t find any, even as we edge closer to the next recession. Since the last global financial crisis, the global economy has been reshaped by different forces, and the coming recession will be caused by factors totally different from those of the last one. First off, the global economy today is mired in uncertainty arising from the trade war, an enfeebled Europe, Brexit and rising geopolitical tensions. An even deeper source of uncertainty is that the liberal global economic order, in place since the 1950s, is dying. Two trends are converging to kill it. The first is the West’s declining economic dominance relative to the rest of the world, and China in particular. The second is the rise of populism in Western democracies, arguably the most serious challenge to the legitimacy of the liberal global order. And yet, even as the liberal global economic order fades away, it’s unclear what a post-liberal global economic order will look like. So for now, the global economy is like a barfly at closing time: it has no clue where it’s going, but it can’t stay here. Developed world economies have meanwhile been seriously weakened by prolonged zero interest rates, making them vulnerable to unexpected shocks. Extraordinarily low interest rates distort the price of money, arguably the single most important price signal in a market economy. They poison the business environment, allowing poorly run businesses to survive, jamming the gears of creative destruction that drive any economic renewal. The survival of poorly run businesses also suck profits from more successful businesses, sapping their ability to expand. Against this backdrop, any number of missteps could trigger chain reactions that push developed world economies into recession. But we should also be prepared for a potentially different kind of downturn. The accepted definition of a recession is two consecutive quarters of contraction in an economy.… Read More →

sample accessily post 1

The Next Recession May Come By Stealth

Markets have been blowing hot and cold regarding the prospects of a recession in the U.S. The Institute of Supply Management’s November survey shows that the index of factory activities in the U.S. fell to 48.1 from 48.3 in October (any reading below 50 is indicative of a contraction). This is confounding the expectation that America’s domestic industrial production would improve in anticipation of a “deal” in the U.S.-China trade war. However, the Department of Labor also reported that 266,000 jobs have been added to the economy in November, bringing unemployment rate down to a historic low of 3.5%. A confusing situation has just been made more confusing. It has been said that generals are always fighting the last war. It’s not that different when it comes to fighting economic downturns. Since the global financial crisis a decade ago, we have been scouring the horizon for any signs of financial fragility, such as asset bubbles, that could plunge us into the next global recession. Despite mounting evidence of a weakening economy, there are no asset bubbles comparable to that of the pre-2008 period. And we won’t find any, even as we edge closer to the next recession. Since the last global financial crisis, the global economy has been reshaped by different forces, and the coming recession will be caused by factors totally different from those of the last one. First off, the global economy today is mired in uncertainty arising from the trade war, an enfeebled Europe, Brexit and rising geopolitical tensions. An even deeper source of uncertainty is that the liberal global economic order, in place since the 1950s, is dying. Two trends are converging to kill it. The first is the West’s declining economic dominance relative to the rest of the world, and China in particular. The second is the rise of populism in Western democracies, arguably the most serious challenge to the legitimacy of the liberal global order. And yet, even as the liberal global economic order fades away, it’s unclear what a post-liberal global economic order will look like. So for now, the global economy is like a barfly at closing time: it has no clue where it’s going, but it can’t stay here. Developed world economies have meanwhile been seriously weakened by prolonged zero interest rates, making them vulnerable to unexpected shocks. Extraordinarily low interest rates distort the price of money, arguably the single most important price signal in a market economy. They poison the business environment, allowing poorly run businesses to survive, jamming the gears of creative destruction that drive any economic renewal. The survival of poorly run businesses also suck profits from more successful businesses, sapping their ability to expand. Against this backdrop, any number of missteps could trigger chain reactions that push developed world economies into recession. But we should also be prepared for a potentially different kind of downturn. The accepted definition of a recession is two consecutive quarters of contraction in an economy.… Read More →

sample accessily post 1

The Next Recession May Come By Stealth

Markets have been blowing hot and cold regarding the prospects of a recession in the U.S. The Institute of Supply Management’s November survey shows that the index of factory activities in the U.S. fell to 48.1 from 48.3 in October (any reading below 50 is indicative of a contraction). This is confounding the expectation that America’s domestic industrial production would improve in anticipation of a “deal” in the U.S.-China trade war. However, the Department of Labor also reported that 266,000 jobs have been added to the economy in November, bringing unemployment rate down to a historic low of 3.5%. A confusing situation has just been made more confusing. It has been said that generals are always fighting the last war. It’s not that different when it comes to fighting economic downturns. Since the global financial crisis a decade ago, we have been scouring the horizon for any signs of financial fragility, such as asset bubbles, that could plunge us into the next global recession. Despite mounting evidence of a weakening economy, there are no asset bubbles comparable to that of the pre-2008 period. And we won’t find any, even as we edge closer to the next recession. Since the last global financial crisis, the global economy has been reshaped by different forces, and the coming recession will be caused by factors totally different from those of the last one. First off, the global economy today is mired in uncertainty arising from the trade war, an enfeebled Europe, Brexit and rising geopolitical tensions. An even deeper source of uncertainty is that the liberal global economic order, in place since the 1950s, is dying. Two trends are converging to kill it. The first is the West’s declining economic dominance relative to the rest of the world, and China in particular. The second is the rise of populism in Western democracies, arguably the most serious challenge to the legitimacy of the liberal global order. And yet, even as the liberal global economic order fades away, it’s unclear what a post-liberal global economic order will look like. So for now, the global economy is like a barfly at closing time: it has no clue where it’s going, but it can’t stay here. Developed world economies have meanwhile been seriously weakened by prolonged zero interest rates, making them vulnerable to unexpected shocks. Extraordinarily low interest rates distort the price of money, arguably the single most important price signal in a market economy. They poison the business environment, allowing poorly run businesses to survive, jamming the gears of creative destruction that drive any economic renewal. The survival of poorly run businesses also suck profits from more successful businesses, sapping their ability to expand. Against this backdrop, any number of missteps could trigger chain reactions that push developed world economies into recession. But we should also be prepared for a potentially different kind of downturn. The accepted definition of a recession is two consecutive quarters of contraction in an economy.… Read More →

sample accessily post 1

The Next Recession May Come By Stealth

Markets have been blowing hot and cold regarding the prospects of a recession in the U.S. The Institute of Supply Management’s November survey shows that the index of factory activities in the U.S. fell to 48.1 from 48.3 in October (any reading below 50 is indicative of a contraction). This is confounding the expectation that America’s domestic industrial production would improve in anticipation of a “deal” in the U.S.-China trade war. However, the Department of Labor also reported that 266,000 jobs have been added to the economy in November, bringing unemployment rate down to a historic low of 3.5%. A confusing situation has just been made more confusing. It has been said that generals are always fighting the last war. It’s not that different when it comes to fighting economic downturns. Since the global financial crisis a decade ago, we have been scouring the horizon for any signs of financial fragility, such as asset bubbles, that could plunge us into the next global recession. Despite mounting evidence of a weakening economy, there are no asset bubbles comparable to that of the pre-2008 period. And we won’t find any, even as we edge closer to the next recession. Since the last global financial crisis, the global economy has been reshaped by different forces, and the coming recession will be caused by factors totally different from those of the last one. First off, the global economy today is mired in uncertainty arising from the trade war, an enfeebled Europe, Brexit and rising geopolitical tensions. An even deeper source of uncertainty is that the liberal global economic order, in place since the 1950s, is dying. Two trends are converging to kill it. The first is the West’s declining economic dominance relative to the rest of the world, and China in particular. The second is the rise of populism in Western democracies, arguably the most serious challenge to the legitimacy of the liberal global order. And yet, even as the liberal global economic order fades away, it’s unclear what a post-liberal global economic order will look like. So for now, the global economy is like a barfly at closing time: it has no clue where it’s going, but it can’t stay here. Developed world economies have meanwhile been seriously weakened by prolonged zero interest rates, making them vulnerable to unexpected shocks. Extraordinarily low interest rates distort the price of money, arguably the single most important price signal in a market economy. They poison the business environment, allowing poorly run businesses to survive, jamming the gears of creative destruction that drive any economic renewal. The survival of poorly run businesses also suck profits from more successful businesses, sapping their ability to expand. Against this backdrop, any number of missteps could trigger chain reactions that push developed world economies into recession. But we should also be prepared for a potentially different kind of downturn. The accepted definition of a recession is two consecutive quarters of contraction in an economy.… Read More →

Are You Non-Shopper?

Some people live to shop, and others would be perfectly happy if they never had to set foot in a store. From looking for a parking space to navigating the aisles full of people slowly going nowhere, a non-shopper will do anything to avoid this situation. Although you cannot totally say no to shopping, there are some things that you can do to make it less stressful.

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Options

The holidays are one of the least favorite shopping times for people who do not like to spend time looking for gifts. They panic at the thought of going to the mall looking for just the right gift for family and friends. Deciding ahead of time what you want to get each person on your shopping list can help to alleviate some of the pressure.

With access to the Internet, it is easier than ever to browse for gifts without ever leaving your chair. Many people who do not like to be part of the crowd at their local mall or big box store choose this method for buying all their gifts. Angels & Emeralds is an example of a company that offers gifts for all occasions, such as angel wing hoop earrings.

Avoid Extending the Shopping Time

If you absolutely must go shopping rather than purchasing what you need online, try to go by yourself. If you invite friends or your sister, you will likely get stuck with someone who loves to shop. Therefore, you will be there even longer than you intended. It can be helpful to go early in the morning instead of the afternoon. Some stores are more crowded at certain times of the day. The day that sales start is another time you should try to avoid.

Think about what you are going to get and make the decision before leaving home. If you can go into the store, get what you are after, and get out, it will be far less of an ordeal. It is impossible to avoid shopping all of the time. If you try a few tricks to make it a little easier, you might not enjoy it, but you may get it done somewhat faster.…

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Pourquoi porter des sabots spéciaux dans un bloc opératoire ?

Le sabot de bloc : adopté par les professionnels de la santé

Les sabots de bloc sont des modèles de chaussures de différentes couleurs et qui sont généralement portées par les internes dans les hopitaux. Une fois portées, ces types de chaussures peuvent garantir à la personne qui les porte un grand confort. Ce qui fait qu’elle pourra se déplacer en permanence sans éprouver de maux au niveau des pieds. Ces sabots doivent pouvoir être portés et enlevés sans aucune difficulté.

Les sabots pour les infirmières et les chirurgiens

Ces modèles de sabots sont le plus souvent portés par les infirmières. C’est un type de chaussure qui peut leur être d’une grande utilité puisqu’elles peuvent passer une bonne partie de la journée à se déplacer. Elles peuvent aussi rester un bon moment de la journée en position debout, ce qui est également le cas des chirurgiens travaillant au bloc opératoire.

Ces types de sabots sont si bien confectionnés qu’ils peuvent aider la personne qui la porte à garder une posture bien droite. Ce qui peut l’aider à éviter les maux au niveau du dos. Des glissades peuvent également être évitées avec ce modèle de sabot. Les infirmières pouvant transporter durant la journée certains liquides qui peuvent causer des glissades une fois renversées.

Des modèles de sabots de bloc avec un look de baskets

Ce sont des types de sabots de blocs qui ont un look de basket. Les chaussures sont d’un grand confort et peuvent être portées par des personnes travaillant dans les hôpitaux et dans les structures de santé. Il s’agit de modèles de sabots de bloc qui peuvent être portés par des personnes qui peuvent être amenées à se déplacer constamment.

Ces modèles de sabots de bloc sont dotés d’une partie extérieure qui est en cuir. Vous n’éprouverez donc aucune difficulté pour en assurer le nettoyage et l’entretien. La doublure en filet de nylon donne à vos pieds un confort qui fait que vous pourrez porter la chaussure pendant toute une journée sans ressentir de la douleur à vos pieds.

Avec la semelle antidérapante et flexible dont elle dispose, vous n’êtes pas prêt de faire des chutes dues à des glissades.

Le sabot médical, une chaussure adaptable à la taille de votre pied

Ce type de sabot peut aller à toutes les tailles de pieds. C’est un modèle de sabot de bloc qui dispose d’une bride en velcro. C’est ce qui fait que vous pouvez le régler à la taille de votre pied. Ce modèle de sabot de bloc est d’une grande légèreté, ce qui fait que vous ne le ressentirez pas lorsque vous l’avez à vos pieds.

Pour votre sécurité, elle est dotée d’une semelle antidérapante, alors que la doublure dont elle dispose aide à une meilleure respiration de votre pied. Vous n’éprouverez aucune difficulté pour le nettoyage de ce modèle de sabot, puisque l’extérieur est en cuir. Vous sentirez un excellent maintien de votre pied une fois que vous l’avez porté.

Le sabot de bloc est …

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What’s the correct way to store a diamond ring?

A diamond ring is not only valuable but also often a special and unique gift given to represent a memorable occasion, such as an engagement; therefore, taking care of it should be a priority.

Image Credit

There is a common belief that diamonds are unbreakable, but they can get chipped and scratched just like other precious stones. This can be both heart-breaking and costly, so let’s look at some useful tips to keep your ring in pristine condition.

Storage

How to store a diamond ring depends on how often it is worn and what storage is available. One of the most important things is to ensure it has its own individual storage box and that it is kept in a dry environment away from any humidity. If you don’t have a specific box, a traditional jewellery box will do the job as long as the ring is stored in an individual compartment.

Protection

If you wear your ring all the time rather than just for special occasions, it is worth getting into the habit of removing it when using your hands for certain jobs, such as the washing up or gardening.

Image Credit

Traditional weddings are proving as popular as ever, with yet another royal wedding recently hitting the headlines. Companies such as https://www.comparethediamond.com/wedding-rings/diamond-scatter-wedding-rings have a variety of diamond scatter wedding rings that are perfect for daily wear. If you are the type of person who forgets where you left things, it is a good idea to always put your ring somewhere safe rather than just on the kitchen windowsill, which is a sure way to lose or misplace it.

Cleaning your jewellery

Before cleaning your jewellery, it is worth taking advice from a professional – or at the very least reading the instructions on the product you are using. Certain chemicals, including the chlorine found in some cleaning solutions, can cause oxidation and possible fading. If your ring includes other stones alongside diamonds, check the other gems are suitable for the cleaner; otherwise, they may become damaged or even broken by the solution.

Damage

If your ring does get damaged, it is wise to get it repaired as soon as possible to stop further deterioration. If it is simply showing signs of wear and tear, this becomes part of the ring itself unless it ruins the appearance.…

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Two Fancy Wedding Gown Trends that You Can Expect in 2019

If you are interested in planning your wedding and the trends that you can expect in the year 2019, you may want to do a little extra research before making your plans. Because wedding fashions can change dramatically from time to time, you may want to know what is really in as well as what is out. Thankfully, there is a large amount of information on wedding sites today that can assist you in choosing a wedding gown collection that you and your family and dearest friends will approve of on the spot. So, for those of you who want to know more about what is hot, here are some trends that you may want to look into right away.

Royal Wedding Fever

As previously stated, if you are getting married in 2019, you need to know what the big rage is all about. And, you should take advantage of this historical time if you want a really memorable event. According to some of the more popular sites, the royal wedding fever is what you can pattern your arsenal of favorites after. This is especially the case for those of you who want to wear a sexy Victorian style gown from a collection that everyone in the room will find it hard to forget. Laced long sleeves with a plunging neckline that stops at the waist and a long flowing wedding dress that completely covers and sweeps the floor as the bride walks. Many of these styles are said to be iconically unique for the next brides to be

Geometric Style Wedding Dress Fashions

In addition to the Royal Wedding Fever Fashions, brides in 2019 will have another great choice when making their selections. Unlike the straight style traditional wedding dresses that follow a simple pattern from top to the bottom, the Geometric Style wedding fashions are excellent for entering the cutting edge bride’s taste. With a wide variety of geometric shapes, the bride has a huge option of collections to make their selections from. In fact, one of the best things about this particular fashion is that designers are paying very close attention to every detail. To be a part of the original modern trendy geometric stylings, the wedding collection has to provide the bride with a diversity of shapes. For example, when each bride steps out, they may decide to choose a triangular back out top bodice that shows every detail curve that she sports on her wedding day.

If you are planning your wedding for 2019, you have a lot to look forward to. Especially, if you want your wedding dress to be trendy, while also following the latest popular fashions in the industry. Starting with Royal Wedding Fever, you can expect to look like the queen’s family. If the royal family look is not really what you envision, you may want to consider the Geometric style Wedding fashions instead. In either case or situation, this is not a time that you can go wrong with your …

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